Friday, November 14, 2008

Sarah Palin Gets Off

...and all-a those jessamine and geraniums that we love and cactuses and Idaho as a girl where I was a Flower of the mountain yah when I put one-a-them roses in my hair like those Arapaho girls we like so much used or am I gonna I wear a red yah and how he kissed me under that good ol' Wasilla High hockey rink we need so much more of and I thought well, ya know, as well him as another and then I asked him with those eyes of mine to ask again yah and then he asked me would I yah to say yah my mountain flower and first I put my arms around him yah and drew him down to me so he could feel those breasts he likes so much all perfume yah and that good old heart o' his was goin' like mad and yah I said yah I will Yah. You betcha!

11 comments:

Linkmeister said...

If she's positioning herself for a presidential run, may I suggest her theme song? "In the Year 2525," by Zager and Evans.

kathleenmaher said...

Brilliant piece, but you give her an awful lot of credit.

mikeinseattle said...

Joyce would have a good laugh.

RobotSlave said...

Somehow, I feel the strand would have been more appropriate.

You'd have gotten more bafflement, probably, but also fewer of these unsightly "Hah! I got it and am smart!" comments.

Neddie said...

Hah! I wrote and I'm smart!

What better than Mollie Bloom's falling-leaf stream of consciousness to illustrate how Palin flits from to irrelevancy to extraneity in mid-sentence? And how am I gonna get in my "You betcha!" punchline?

JC said...

You have runined Joyce for me. But did you read Camille Paglia on Salon yesterday? She completely jumped the shark. She loves Palin, and compares her speaking style to (gulp) bebop jazz. Thus, between them, Paglia and Neddie have managed to ruin both Joyce and Charlie Parker for me.
But I think someone else nailed it yesterday. They described Palin's talk as "pageant speak." I think that is about perfect.

HomefrontRadio said...

The original lyric for Kate Bush's 'The Senusal World' was Molly Bloom's soliloquy.

The Sensual World

Due to this association, I now have visions of Palin strutting through the Alaskan Woods, pert with desire, frottering herself against Bears, and leaving Beavers somewhat startled.

THANKS NEDDIE.

RobotSlave said...

"What better than Mollie Bloom's falling-leaf stream of consciousness to illustrate how Palin flits from to irrelevancy to extraneity in mid-sentence?

You mean apart from the bit where this makes Molly a deeply sympathetic character?

OK, yeah, that's a little cheap, but it doesn't make it untrue. So. If we take the bit on the strand (in Nausicaa), we instead see a clearly debased narrator masturbating while watching a an inconsequential character who participates willingly, but only obliquely, in the narrative...

Well, Christ, man, I frankly think you've got to have a lot of years between your blogging and your last reading of the thing if you don't see that as a better metaphorical fit for the Palin odyssey.

But yeah, you do have a point there with your "punchline," which I take to include your subject/header text and your slightly-too-many leading-up-to uses of "ya." Perils of cut-and-paste there, I'm afraid.

Neddie said...

Yes, JC, I did see the Paglia thing. What an utterly weird comparison, given that a bebop solo is pretty much the diametric opposite of verbal communication. Sounds like somebody has a taste for Palin Fundament. Better her than me, I guess.

RobotSlave, while I take your point about the Strand passage, I'm afraid you're falling into the very Joyce-holery that you accuse others of. And every "yah" is exactly where Joyce had a "yes," so I'm a bit puzzled about your accusation of overuse -- unless you're saying that the Great Man himself did it.

Anonymous said...

Hilarious.

Just happened by here while enjoying your work on the Chumps of Choice site. Thank you, and everyone involved, for laying out a map of the brilliant behemoth that is AtD.

Jim said...

It is even more disturbing to read if you hear her voice at stump-speech volume and cheers from the crowd punctuating the passage from time to time.

Nicely done, Ned of the Hill